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been acting lame. china may indeed be slowing, i don't like to see the oil index plummet. the speculation. i don't like washington back on the front page. they come along at the right moment to put the cabarb on any rally. jellystone national park, yogi. i am concerned about the payroll tax holiday going away. i am worried about higher taxes, autosales could be slowing. did anyone think -- did anyone think we would maintain the streak longer than the ah mazing hittering streak of joe dimaggio. no-hitters endlessly. the late, great marty sly said, we got the chance to watch him, don't fight the tape and don't fight the fed. if the economy is going to slow down because of the fed, don't filt that as a gardener, even if i am a savage fighting machine gardener, i like the concept of rain. i like to believe you can have a garden variety squall. i just think they we were due, over due. maybe for a bit of rain or a thunderstorm. for those of you who don't pay for espn. i saw green bay lose a bunch of games, i have written off the yankees, why can't the market have a losing sessi
. >> reporter: china remains a major competitor for u.s. companies. our trade deficit with china hit a record $315 billion last year. separately, china reported it's exports grew 25% over a year ago, easily beating expectations. the robust growth was attributed to aggressive new lending by chinese banks. >> just a few months ago, the chinese economy was in contraction. we've seen really two or three months where we are seeing much stronger growth in china and that's increasing the demand for goods there. >> reporter: but analysts say the news from china may have been somewhat distorted by statistical quirks and the start of the chinese new year. looking at a few months of data shows the big story in china is one of moderate, but solid growth. >> they're not falng apart. growth is going to hold in the range of 7% to 8%. but this is not going to go back to 10% either. there's no signs of that. it looks like its a more permanent, but controllable slow down. >> reporter: china remains strong in assembling and processing goods like iphones that are then exported by foreign companies. when economis
been acting lame. china may indeed be slowing, i don't like to see the oil index plummet. >> still higher tax occur. i think auto sales could be slowing. the dollar is the strongest it's been in seven months. those are all bad, all right? but let's step back for a second. did anyone really think the rally could keep going up week after week after week after week? did anyone think we could maintain this streak anymore than the amazing hitting streak of joe dimaggio? did we really expect this market to throw nothing but no-hitters? oil down the hardest in two months? is that like cal ripken in the end? look, the market has had an amazing run. that would be bad because the late, great marty sly said famously, among so many other terrific admonitions, i hope you did get the chance to watch him when he was on "wall street week." to me, as a gardener, not kidding, a gardener, everyon if am, indeed, a savage, mean, fighting gardener. i like the concept of rain every now and then. i like to believe we could have a garden variety squall and i think this is the beginning of one today. in oth
to step aside. >>> the rush to set up shop in china is down. the fastest decline in more than three years in january. >>> okay. lots happening on the program today including a grew interviewer coming up. we'll be counting down to the bank of england minutes after andrew bailey is to lead the new banking regulation unit. the minutes will be out in a half-hour's time. we'll bring those and u.k. unemployment figures. >>> the central bank watch extends overseas as investors stand by for minutes from the federal reserve's latest meeting. they're due out later this afternoon in the u.s. will the fomc offer clues on an end to qe3? we're joined at 11:30 to weigh in. >>> with india's government clouded in corruption allegations, we'll speak to one of the country's wealthiest individuals and what it means for business. billionaire udai kotak joins us in 20 minutes' time. >>> plenty coming up including sony which is heading to the bill apple for a major on, national endowment. will the game console giant take the wraps off its rumored playstation? expert analysis at 11:20 cet. >>> and bhb bulletin h
about last night, i am concerned about copper. it's been acting a little lame and that means china, indeed, may be slowing. i don't like to see the oil service index plummet, if we could break the 33-day streak, that wouldn't be all that terrible. i don't like washington backen o the front page. they're a short sellers delight. they come on the right moment to put the kaibosh on a rally. and i am concerned about the payroll tax holiday going away. i'm worried about still higher tax, i think auto sales could be slowing. the dollar was as strong as it's been in months. those are all bad, all right? let's step back for a second. did anyone really think the rally could keep going up week after week after week? did anyone think we could maintain the streak any more than the hitting streak of joe dimaggio? did we expect the market to hit endlessly? oil down the hardest in two months. is that like cal ripken quitting in the end? the markets had an amazing run. we don't want the federal reserve to start ratcheting up interest rates all of a sudden. because as the late great marty said famo
in the pacific. not just about china, but about some of the intraasian problem that is we're seeing. and if you can doing what our economists at aei absolutely revile, link it back to some of of the, you know, economic questions that we face and the prosperity that we've gotten used to up to a point? >> thanks. well, first,ing now you know how asia feels in these discussions, always sort of last, and when attention comes, it's sort of quick. [laughter] >> this is why you grew a beard. >> exactly. let me, let me mention three things. that i think will be on the radar that we should be aware of. and then link it, actually, back to the broader discussion, what dani asked about the economics. um, so, you know, if tom was talking about the immediate game and fred was talking about the short-term game, asia sees itself as the long-term game. and they sue -- they view what's going on there in those terms. of it's not something that -- well, whatever i'm about to mention, they don't think it's going to be resolved tomorrow. they don't think that the trends they're dealing with are at any point in time
the national anthem at a hockey game. plus -- china celebrating a start to their lunar new year calendar. the traditional way. with fireworks! >> some incredible video of fireworks lighting up the night sky in beijing. as people in china celebrated the first few hours of the chinese new year saturday night. the fireworks were set off at midnight on the first day of the month in china's lunar calendar. it's a tradition they've been following for centuries. the media in china says tens of thousands of firefighters and police officers were on standby -- in case of any fires and emergencies. >> and take a look at this! -- during the national anthem at a bakersfield condors hockey game on friday the teams mascot got free from its handler and escaped across the ice. the handler managed to chase it down. but took a hard spill on the ice. allowing the condor to get loose again. the large bird then hops across the ice and leaps onto the bakersfield bench sending some players and their coach away in terror. eventually the condor headed down the tunnel to the lockerroom where its handler was able t
of 115 tons to china sxhooin japan. >> it's virlt we'll impossible. >> in the documentary a journalist demonstrates how easy it is to buy illegal ivory while another, brian christy, looks at the rapid middle class growth in china which is fuelling the demand for illegal ivory. >> ivory has been prized in china for over 2,000 years as a status symbol. perfect for depicting religious figures, a material like no other. our research revealed that 83% of china's huge middle class intends to buy ivory products in the future. >> joining us now investigative reporter and contributing writer for national geographic magazine brian christy and actress and activist kristin davis. it is great to have you both here. >> thank you for having us. >> kristen, i mean, staggering, staggering, and shocking. scloo heart breaking. >> and i guess i wonder, a, you know, how did you come to this issue? it feels like, you know, someone of your stature and acclaim, it's very important to have spokes people on this issue and especially where consumers are so involved, so tell us a little bit about your history zoo
is these advanced persistent threats. >> the advanced persistent threat is the guy that comes every day, in china, reports to work and sits in that network. >> undetected and extracting information. >> in a new report released this week the cyber security firm mandiant pinpointed where some of the most sophisticated hackers in china are working, in or around this building, a chinese military unit's headquarters on the outskirts of shanghai. this elite group of hackers has been dubbed the shanghai group. they've struck 141 times since 2006 across all sectors of the u.s. economy. this is the first time such a group has been tracked right to the doorstep of the people's liberation army. the shanghai group is not the first to be accused of cyber theft. >> it's scary. i mean, this is the problem. it's scarey. >> brian shields, a computer security specialist suspected the chinese of hacking into his company as early as 2004. he worked for nortel, a giant canadian telecommunications company. a success story, nortel made cell phone equipment and at its height the company employed 20,000 people in the u.s
the lights are on. where the lights are off and mongolia and parts of china, and unfortunately, my state of alaska. this is not such a prosperous area. how we utilize this is basic premise, starting from energy is good and moving from their is part of how we want to launch this discussion. and contained within this, again, five pretty simple propositions. we need to move to an energy policy that is abundant, affordable, clean, diverse, secure. when you look at energy in that context, it really does help give you some parameters and guidelines as to how to move forward. as you go through this proposal -- again, think about it in the context which i am offering yet. not legislation. the first question is going to be when we will see the first bill. you will see legislation move forward based on the conversations, based on debate and dialogue on issues. whether it is how we advance revenue sharing or how we put in place and export policy that is not only go ahead -- good for jobs, working with the balance of trade that is so incredibly important. establishe trying to here is a good directio
in beijing was muted given the record levels of air pollution. >> you decided to go to china town this weekend? >> we thought we would try. lunar new year is probably not the best day of the year to casually swing by and hope for a spot. >> no. >>> meanwhile, hundreds of thousands of resolvers took to the streets to enjoy parties and parades. rio's carnival alone sets to generate more than $650 million for the local economy, as well as celebrations in 2013 as well as a test of brazil's infrastructure ahead of the world cup next year and the olympic games in 2016. joining us for more is mya bandari. huge infrastructure problem, actually, for brazil with those events. are they meeting that challenge? >> well, i think the key point really to make about things like olympics and the world cup is that they tend to have fairly standard effects, if you like, on the economy. we saw that with the uk, we saw that with china. you have really a temporary fiscal boost in the two quarters in the run up to the event. then what happens in the actual quarter is a little bit dubious. it depends on,
away their sins. china has overtaken the u.s. to become the world's biggest trading nation. china's imports and exports totalled 3.87 trillion dollars last year compared to 3.82 trillion for the u.s. the u.s. economy overall is still more than double the size of chinas. chinese new year's celebrations are ushering in the year of the snake. parades and fireworks marked the holiday. people born in the year of the snake are considered stylish and good with money. in beijing singer celine dion became the first foreigner to start an official new year's festivity. she sang a duet in mandarin chinese, one of china's most popular folk songs. still ahead, would you trade your car for a microcar?pr i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. if you're living with moderate to severe crohn's disease, and it feels like your life revolves around your symptoms, ask your gastroenterologist about humira adalimumab. humira has been proven to work for adults who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms of moderate to severe
markets and china. these are the kind of things that affect commodities such as gold. back to you. liz: sometimes people sell what i have to sell off marginal cost. we're watching it very closely. down 99-point the dow jones industrials. you can call it exciting, what we're hearing from traders, dramatic reaction to the fed minutes with your questioning how long they will stay in the quantitative easing business trying to prop up the market. are there questions about it? what does that mean? one less reason to buy stocks because that is what is propping up the market. lumber prices, no problem, skyrocketing. hosting points started to slide, but lumber companies are molding their business to react to the change in cost. jeff flock in chicago were the past couple of weeks longer has been up on a couple of locations. >> it has really been flying high except for today when the numbers came in. been in business over 100 years in chicago. the guy who is running for the last 40 years says he thinks lumber has room to run. today, those housing starts came out, what happened? it took a major du
computers in a flaw in java software. an investigation is underway. >>> china's defense ministry says a report accusing china of hacking attacks on u.s. targets is flawed. in a statement released today, china's military says the report tying the cyber attacks to a secret-chinese military unit working out of this facility in wrong. the defense ministry says merely linking the ip addresses to the facility is not technical proof. >>> 7:49. some california farmers feel line they are being stunned -- stung. >>> the serious reason a sea otter was trained how to slam- dunk. >>> welcome back. a shortage of honey bees threatening california's almond crop. reportedly more than 800,000 acres of almonds are planted all over california. the growers want to cash in the higher sale prices for almonds but they are having a tough time finding bees to pollinate the plants. diseases that reduce the population and out of stay bee croppers face tougher inspections. >>> this is 16-year-old eddie the sea otter, an expert at the slam dunk. >> he's great. >> sees so good, zookeepers say he rarely missing -- h
than three goals and they really only needed one because he was really a great wall of china in china town, if i can say it that way. 27 saves. caps win 5-0. hey coach, that sure felt good, didn't it? >> we were just talking, was it the five goals? kind of both. great for braden. he made the big save for us, and after that, we didn't give him much and we scored some goals and obviously a will the of positives. >> playing two teams on tuesday. well, as much as i make fun of georgetown's offense, which can be painful to watch at times, the hoyas are a game out of first place. john thompson, iii, could care less what his system looks like. how would it fair on the road, though? always a slug fest in the big east. they would say the fibers. he would have 20. that makes six of his last eight games. second half, otto porter doing work down in the coast. one handed stab and then the lay in. the old fashioned three point play. eli carter from deep. the rainbow step back 3. he was 4 of 9, 80 seconds to go. my name is otto and i like buckets. the window work in one. he goes for 19-14. georget
the united states army. he serves the -- the army sends him to china. he wants to see asia. it is not the first time the military service lies to an enlistee -- he does not go. he goes across the street to the marine corps, says, will you send me to china? the sergeant says, we will send you to china. after china, he goes and serves -- he comes back at the age of 20. he has served honorably in all branches of the united states military. there is no air force at the time. comes back and falls in love with a woman in his hometown in montana who says, i will have nothing to do with you until you finish school. he finishes high school and goes on to be a professor of asian history at the university of montana and is elected to the congress of the united states. united states ambassador to japan under president carter and president reagan. when he dies, written on his tombstone at arlington tom at his request, is michael joseph mansfield, born march 16, 1903, died october 5, 2001 -- drive it, united states marine corps. no leader, no and that -- majority leader, ambassador to ja
. >> the white house encouraged, martha, by the response of china to that north korean nuclear test. they believe china willing to crack down a little harder now? >> well, i think the response was somewhat muted from china, i think they expected more. they condemned the test. china tried to talk north korea out of testing a nuclear weapon but they did it. but they didn't really threaten them with any action but believe me, president obama would like to get china, china's help in this issue. >> so, tell us, again, matt, how much can the president get done tonight? how much could he put concerted pressure on this room? >> i think it's really interesting, because in terms of second term presidents, they understand that political capital is a diminishing resource. they know that two key pillars for that political capital are his inaugural address and state of the union address. those are the two most important things he can do to keep momentum moving. if he starts to lose it, it's very difficult for him to do it. that's why this speech and the inaugural, they always look at them like a package, put t
are rising on the last trading day of the week as traders hear strong data reports out of china, germany and of course here in the united states. the both the s&p 500 and the nasdaq are on track for the fifth con executive weekly gains. the dow is up 44 points. >>> the u.s. trade deficit unexpectedly narrowed in december on a drop in oil imports and higher exports. according to the commerce department the trade gap fell 21%. that is the smallest gap in almost three years. >>> because of stronger than expected trade report goldman sachs is boosting its fourth quarter gdp forecast. goldman did leave the estimate unchanged saying that stronger december trade is offset by weaker than expected wholesale inventories. that's the latest from the fox business, giving you the power to prosper melissa: so earlier lori rothman got a chance to speak so the ceo of citi mortgage. here she is. >> 30-year mortgage rates hovering at a four-month high, around 3 1/2% but mortgage applications continue to rise. so is this a sign that rates bottomed? no one better to ask than my next guest. he is the ceo of c
wonder if america's greatest technologicallyal achievements are behind us and if other nations like china and india will soon surpass us or perhaps already have. some nations are creating environments so attractive to global manufacturers that companies have relocated much of their activities on foreign soil. our global trade imbalance is growing as we export less and import more. and today this imbalance includes many high-backed products. other nations are changing their policies to become more competitive and so should we. fortunately blazing trails into new frontiers is what america has always done best. to set the stange for this congress and to -- stage for this congress and to understand where america's heading, we have very knowledgeable witnesses testifying before us today. each of them thoroughly ppedses both public and private research and development efforts as well as where our global competitors are headed. members of this committee have the opportunity to work together on policies that will help america stay competitive and today's hearing is a first step. that concludes my
with the first lady's office in terms of needing to order additional pieces of presidential china that would be used for state dinners as well. we had supplements made of the fdr service and the wilson service to fill out those services, because they had been depleted by breakage and so forth over the years. in the year 2000 when the white house historical association offered to fund a new state service, we work closely with mrs. clinton in deciding about the colors, the designs that would go on the service, how those particular colors would looked in the various settings in the state dining room are the east room. i do remember mrs. clinton's mother was living in the house at the time. she would come to some of these little meetings about showing samples from the porcelain factory. none of them seem to be satisfactory. she said of in the bathroom of my suite is a beautiful yellow color. she said i think we should try that yellow color. so we got a sample of the wallpaper and sent it off to lennox, and they did some samples, and it worked out beautifully. i think that was mrs. rodham's legac
look at who has the state visits. there were india, china, mexico, korea, germany. it would be a spectacular thing for canada and u.s. relations if the two agreed to host reciprocal states. one year it could have them come here and spent time with obama's then the next year they would go up there. it is symbolic. it is like in canada that where host the royals. you also remember your history and pay attention to the way -- we have had an -- we have not had one since 1997. surely you can do it with canada. the keystone is not approved, we cannot have this conversation. for the keystone getting approved and the state visit if you do not mind. >> there you go. >> there was a moment in the presidential race during the republican primaries. i cannot remember who said it. one of the candidates talked about the keystone and set it to president obama to drive canada into the arms of china. i want to ask paul -- or in washington are skeptical about that. they say that they will send this oil to china, but will they get the pipeline built? what are you seeing on how likely this will b
that it will consider fines and other trade actions against china or any other country guilty of cyber espionage. we will continue to follow that story and bring you any remarks that may come out from administration officials today. the supreme court is expected to hear arguments in late march in two prominent cases that could test the bounds of laws restricting gay marriage. authors of "recently released book some day marriage recently debated the issue at harvard university. it is and about how to by the federalist society at harvard. this is one hour. >> thank you. richard fallon is the junior professor of constitutional law at harvard law school. he also earned a ba degree from oxford university, where he was a rhodes scholar. he served as a law clerk to justices of the united states supreme court and has written extensively about constitutional and federal courts law. he is the author of several books. we are very grateful for him for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago an
and china is set to pass us by that stame measure and worth pointing out the u.s. gdp is larger than any of thoyce two countries. >> and why it is it so important when you look at sequestration. thank you for that report. >> there is new numbers that show americans are once again starting to borrow mon i against their homes at a record pace. what up need to know to keep from getting in trouble with home equitty loanings. stay with us. . . like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual behavior, stop taking tami
. >>brian: countries like russia and china are ramping up their pheults. we are gutting -- -- ramping up their militaries. we are gutting ours. are we putting our military are we putting our military at risk? oh! progress-oh! [ female announcer ] with 40 delicious progresso soups at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your progress-oh! story on facebook. if we took the nissan altima and reimagined nearly everything in it? gave it greater horsepower and class-leading 38 mpg highway... advanced headlights... and zero gravity seats? yeah, that would be cool. introducing the completely reimagined nissan altima. it's our most innovative altima ever. nissan. innovation that excites. ♪ >>brian: let me tell you what's happening in sports. lebron james making history against the lakers. ep set a heat record by scoring at least 30 points five games in a row. he's been unbelievable. lebron became the third player with at least 30 points and 60% shooting in five straight games. anyone else on that team? the heat won 107-97. they won five in a ro
emanating from china. our guest this john reed. a discussion of saving for retirement with paul taylor. live every day at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> i think it's a pretty accurate that they do not live by the roles of both cases. i think they bend the rules to fit their circumstances. i think americans at all westerners tend to be a lot more legalistic and the things that we went in subcontract. once we see things are written on a contract, that is the be all and all. chinese will sign any contract or agree to any trade agreement and after the ink is dry they would try to figure out how to get around the requirements. it is just a relentless drive to get a head. it is what has built the place over the last 30 years. this relentless drive to get a head and to get better and to improve. they see some of the restrictions we put on them in terms of trade. they see that as we are trying to hold china down. we basically operated in a world without rules for years to build our economy up another we are up to the top are try to hamstring them or tie them up with rules and regulations to hold china d
to resolve energy disputes from the south china sea to the eastern mediterranean to keep the world's energy market stable. now this has been helped quite significantly by the increase in their own domestic production. it's no accident that is iranian oil has gone off-line because of our sanctions other sources have come on line so iran cannot and if it from increased prices. then there is human rights and our support for democracy and the rule of law, levers of power and values we cannot afford to ignore. in the last century the united states led the world in recognizing that universal rights exist and that governments are obligated to protect them. now we have placed ourselves at the front lines of today's emerging battles like the fight to defend the human rights of the lgbt communities around the world and religious minorities wherever and whoever they are. but it's not a coincidence that virtually every country that threatens regional and global peace is a place where human rights are in peril or the rule of law is weak. more specifically, places where women and girls are treated as sec
, sharon chin shows us, preparing food and lots of it. >> families in china host parties to celebrate lunar new year's eve. this restaurant in san francisco china town carries on the century's old tradition. >> you have to make your own. >> and you do it together. >> wilma pang showed how to make a sugar filled dough ball in soup. it's harder than it looks. >> there's a hole in it. wait, there are two holes. >> wilma and volunteers are part of a better chinatown tomorrow. they educate the community about chinese culture. >> the dutch house is shaped like a crescent moon, also shaped like -- indicated prosperity. >> these students came for a taste of chinese culture and dumpling cuisine. the new year, 4711 is the year of the snake. one of the 12 zodiac animals. some say it's good news for finances, but others know snake years include the 1929 depression, pearl harbor in 1941. the massacre in 1989, and september 11 in 2001. some plan to slither from risk. >> move with caution, just like a snake. they are very cautious. >> whatever you think of the year of the snake, it does sta
to direct your attention to a little skirmish in the china sea and the bbc it is calling it a little skirmish that could have big, big consequences, think world war iii consequences, and it is because of these teeny islands that are inhabitable, and even the name is in dispute with china calling them one thing and japan calling them another. the dispute was reignited when the chinese government accused tokyo of stealing, and sent two naval enforcement ships to the area in a show of force. across china, anti-japanese protests started causing a protest of japanese protests and those who use them. and the protests are so bad that a chinese man made the simple mistake of driving a japanese car in a chai neads city of chian and was beat sewn badly he is paralyzed. this week, a chinese minister accused a japanese vessel of target i targeting the radar on a japanese ship off of the islands, but the chinese officials are disputing it happened. now think about this, the world's second and the third largest economies playing chicken in the pacific over a dispute of uninhabited islands, but if
. extra communism of china is communism in name only and these days and it basically preserved the power of the countries, but they through the ideology aside. communism in china talks about marxism, etc., but it is all about preserving the country's power economically as the country continues to grow because they threw aside most the stages of communism a long time ago. in north korea, it is all about preserving the power of the military and the dynasty that you have there, and it has nothing to do with what karl marx envisioned. somebody could do a fascinating book on how one communism diverged into asia was something different than what appeared in europe and the eastern european countries. >> former washington post correspondent and harvard fellow keith richburg on 30 years of reporting and insight from around the world sunday on c-span's "q&a." >> if blockades are the strategy of the north states, the principal strategy is economic aid. if you caught a emerging ship, the idea was to put a prize crew on board, take it to a be adjudicated, sell it at cost and actual auction, and you g
thing was to deal with china, which you could do separate from negotiations and separate root from all the processes because really that's, china is just a huge emitter. and, you can't deal with the problem without them. i mean you can't deal without us either but you can't deal without them. he might make that a focus. that might improve things. but really, maybe some difference. i wouldn't say a lot. >> and from your time back in the state department in the clinton years you were involved in some early efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions. i don't know if you have any perspective on less sorns learned -- lessons learned in the approach tried then. >> i think we made a number of mistakes. it was me at least in part. what did we really learn? i think the most important lesson from kyoto is you can not negotiate a treaty unless you're prepared to do stuff at home to meet the requirements. and i think, it wasn't enough thinking that went into what it is that the u.s. was prepared to do domestically before kyoto was negotiated. and then of course we had other reasons it was never subm
china, russia and some of the mideast countries want to have more government involvement in the development of the internet. the u.s.-led involvement in the internet, they're concerned about the multi-stakeholder private-sector governance of the internet which i think has led to the internet's wonders of the great development of that and i'm very much on the side of the united states on this. and by the way this is one area in which the republicans or democrats, this is the one area that they can easily agree on. now on the other hand some republicans point to exactly the point that you make and that is there is some hypocrisy here. we are saying hey wait a minute we want a free network that on the other hand we want rules like network neutrality here domestically and we won't want to have the government involved in the international sphere. i think on the other hand some folks who support the network neutrality rules would say there is quite a difference between those two instances and that would not be a fair comparison. i probably am on the side of the import to your q
, you know, if mali is a priority, egypt is a priority, turkey is a priority, the conflict between china, japan, and south korea is a worry, the worry about a north korean nuclear test is a priority. we could go on and on. a secretary of state's job really is to keep all those balls in the air so, frankly, we're on tv talking about them as little as possible. >> right. you know, michael, the other thing that strikes me that now-secretary kerry is going to have to deal with is the changing nature of some of these engagements. it's not just drones and deployments but what's the complement of troops we send? what's the complement of non -- of folks from the state department that we send? the relationship between the pentagon and the state department seems to have changed as well. how will he weigh in on that? >> yeah, those are good questions. i think if i could just take two examples. with syria and also with afghanistan, you have questions of where the united states has to figure out some next policy steps that are pretty big and get to the question you raise, the balance between troops p
in china due to great sales. a right wing newport completely butchered the story, saying that the jeep was considering giving up the united states and shifting production to china. enter mitt romney. >> i saw a story today that one of the great manufacturers in this state, jeep, now owned by the italians is thinking of moving all production to china. >> there was also the lie about president barack obama never saying benghazi was an act of terrorism. >> obama knowingly lied to the american people. obama created a conspiracy theory and coordinated a campaign of deceit to distract from the truth that affects our national security. >> mitt romney listened to this kind of stuff for weeks. and because he relied on this junk, he walked into the biggest trap on the largest possible stage. >> i think it's interesting the president just said something which is on the day after the attack, he went in the rose garden and said that this was an act of terror. >> that's what i said. >> you said in the rose garden the day after the attack it was an act of terror. >> no acts of terror will ever shake
, to intellectual property. the blueprints for jobs in the next generation with nation states slyke china, and it has gotten exponentially worse, even since the presidential debates. it is unbelievable and breathtaking. the second part of that is the attack part that we're so vulnerable for, actually shutting down our financial services or finding other ways to destroy material in companies that won't allow them to function on a day-to-day basis. and that is very, very concerning. we've seen that recently with iran. >> schieffer: jane, what-- are we being attacked now? >> yes. keith islamabad the hea alexander has said there have been 19 ear 20 substantial cyber attack in addition the last several years, more to come. i think we're much more vulnerable to a catastrophic cyber attack than a catastrophic terrorist attack in the homeland. we have done a better job of decapitating al qaeda. it's not capable, i don't think, any more of an attack like 9/11. congress has not act. there have been several bills introduced, including one by my colleague and friend, mike, but they haven't moved. and
china to the people in san francisco. let's celebrate and grow together. >> that is awesome. thank you for joining us here at the asian art museum in san francisco. this opens up on february the 22nd. it's a can't miss event. let's get to the weather maps. as we are upon the new year here in the san francisco bay area. we did have snow of our own back here last night and also early this morning down to 500 feet of rain snow mix and a dusting of snow across the santa cruz mountains. those of you in the fremont hills, we get a rain-snow mix. let's advance to the weather maps. we have the blizzard in the northeast, producing 1 to 3 feet of snow. if you are headed that way, do expect major delays. meanwhile, for tonight, we are expecting temperatures that are going to be dropping down in to the 20s and the 30s, areas of patchy frost for the north bay and east bay and like lg ice on the roads. this exhibit, once again, it's out here at the asian art museum of san francisco, you can come out this sunday, even to the museum while it's not open just yet. the exhibit, you can enjoy the fest act
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